Sexual Harassment

Sexual Harassment

The University is committed to taking effective action to prevent and correct sexual harassment by or against members of the University community. Sexual harassment is defined as follows:
Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature constitute sexual harassment when:



  • submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual's employment or academic or student status, or
  • submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for employment, academic or other institutional decisions impacting the individual, or
  • such conduct is sufficiently severe, persistent, or pervasive that it unreasonably interferes with, limits, or deprives an individual from participating in or benefiting from the University's education or employment programs and/or activities.

Fayetteville State University's Sexual Harassment PolicySexual harassment can serious problem for students at all educational levels. Students colleges and universities can be victims of sexual harassment. This problem is more common than you might think because many students are scared or too embarrassed to report sexual harassment. It is different from flirting, playing around, or other types of behavior that you enjoy or welcome. Sexual harassment can be requests for sexual favors or unwelcome sexual behavior that is bad enough or happens often enough to make you feel uncomfortable, scared or confused and that interferes with your schoolwork or your ability to participate in extracurricular activities or attend classes.

Sexual harassment can be verbal (comments about your body, spreading sexual rumors, sexual remarks or accusations, dirty jokes or stories), physical (grabbing, rubbing, flashing or mooning, touching, pinching in a sexual way, sexual assault) or visual (display of naked pictures or sex-related objects, obscene gestures). Sexual harassers can be fellow students, professors, friends, coaches, and other school employees. This information was adapted from Equal Right's Sexual Harassment at School article. For the full article, please visit  Sexual Harassment at School.